St. Arnou Pilsner
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Company info:
St. Arnou Pty Ltd
SYDNEY, N.S.W

www.st-arnou.com.au

Bottle size sampled: 330 mL

Alcohol: 4.5%
Standard drinks: 1.2

Cap type: Non-twist

Cost: I picked this up for AU$3.20

Label info: ‘St. Arnou premium beers are a lasting tribute to Arnold of Metz. A lover of beer, he was proclaimed St. Arnou, Patron Saint of Brewing in 640AD.
He was born in 580AD in Metz, France. During his life he converted from an advisor to the Roman army, to becoming a monk and then Bishop of Metz. St. Arnou died in 640AD whereafter the citizens of Metz ceremoniously returned his body home. During this journey a miracle happened. At an ale house in the town of Champigneulle, the tired porters carrying his coffin received a mug of ale that never ran dry ‘ 
AND
‘Pilsner – The miracle of Czech Saaz hops and their citrusy flavours define this Pilsner. With triple filtering for purity, the hop aroma is balanced by just the right bitterness to deliver a naturally crisp and full flavoured beer’. 

What the label really means: Could this amazing story of St. Arnou and the miraculous ever-flowing beer mug be simply a marketing ploy, or did this really happen? I I like to believe that it did actually happen, but it has me asking a few questions. If the mug never ran dry, did the porters hang on to it? Did it get smashed over the head of some lonely pilgrim in a bar fight over a game of pool and the dubious two shot rule? Is it kept guarded somewhere safe, like the grail in the third Indiana Jones film, awaiting a worthy recipient? It’s got me intrigued and excited, caught up in the mythos, and I haven’t even had my first sip!

The Hell-Cat review starts here

Label: The folk at St. Arnou brewery have obviously gone for a premium, imported beer, look and feel. This is accentuated by the tongue in cheek text ‘Imported from Australia’. St. Arnou is targeting the premium beer drinker market, but thankfully without the price tag you may expect from genuinely imported beers. I like the label. I like the traditional look it has, the regal purple, the bishop head piece on the logo. It all just works.

I give it a label rating of 8 out of 10.
 

AROMA: A sweet, fresh, hoppy aroma wafts out.

Taste: GLASS – Quite light in colour, the pilsner sits winking at me with its full-bodied head and raised brow. I take a sip and find it to be very enticing. It’s good! It’s refreshing and smooth, it has a markedly bitter hoppy taste, but counteracted with a sweet honey after taste. 

I give it a beer from glass rating of 7 out of 10.

Taste: BOTTLE – Drinking from the bottle takes the edge off the hoppy bitterness but doesn’t quite have the complexity of drinking from the glass. I still enjoy it, but with each sip I feel I am missing something important.

I give it a taste from bottle rating of 7 out of 10.

A word from the wife: “Fizzy, full-bodied fruitiness”

She gave it a taste rating of 6 out of 10.

Accompanying food: The prevalent bitterness in this beer makes me suggest this as a good pre-dinner drink. It will open up the salivary glands and get you feeling starved. I’d love to have this with peanuts, pretzls, and dried fruit.

Best season to appreciate: Totally a warmer months beer, and if I owned the mug of ever-flowing goodness, I’d put its powers to the test.

All-nighter beer? On first sip I didn’t think I could have this all night, but it’s really grown on me. So I will say yes, this is an all-nighter beer.

NEXT WEEK: Tsingtao

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Comments
  1. BargeDave says:

    I had to search a few bottle-shops before locating this one but it was definitely worth the hunt. Tasty hoppy pilsner, genuinely in the Czech style. I regard this beer as being very different to the ‘catalan pilsner’ which was reviewed a couple of weeks ago. This is right up there with Squires Pilsner as an outstanding Australian version of an eastern European classic. Top stuff, especially with summer coming on.

    Like

  2. Ben says:

    The only time I have tried St Arnou was at the Opera Bar (on tap) and can only remember being very Adrian Quist after drinking a number of those rip off ‘schmiddy’ sized glasses they serve there. I will give it another go in the comfort of my own home with a Tottenham Hotspur emblazed pint glass.

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    • McLean not MacLean says:

      I wouldn’t judge a beer by drinking it from a Tottenham Hotspur pint glass. ALL beer tastes good out of a Tottenham Hotspur pint glass.

      Hellcat, the combination of your enthsued review and your wife’s amazingly articulate alliteration has me convinced to try this brew at the first available opportunity. Thanks for the tip bro!

      Like

      • Mason Hell-Cat says:

        I definitely suggest you try this drop, McLean. I am keen to hear your thoughts.

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      • McLean not MacLean says:

        By the way Hellcat, I’m looking forward to the Tsingtao review. I have always enjoyed this drop but I’m not sure if this was because I only ever drink it in oriental restaurants and that makes me feel like it’s ‘authentic’ (I’m a sucker for that kind of thing: Moretti with Pasta, Estrella with tapas, Tiger with indian curry etc).

        But your beer reviews follow a proven and stringent scientific process, so this will be the true test for Tsingtao. If I wasn’t typing right now, I would be rubbing my hands with glee at the prospect of next week’s blog.

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  3. Sniv Whettuce says:

    I’ve met St Arnou Pilsener before, on many occasions, in fact. When I was a member of the Melbourne Guzzlers Drinking Team we used to train on the stuff. I have fond memories of it. I just wish I could remember them. Nine out of ten.

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