Posts Tagged ‘craftbeer’

Inedit - BOTTLEInedit Damm
Spanish flag - SMALL

Company info:
Brassee Par: C.C Damm
Barcelona, SPAIN

[No website listed]

Bottle size sampled: 330ml

Alcohol: 4.8%
Standard drinks: 1.5

Cap type: Non-twist

Cost: I picked this up for $TBC AU

Label info: ‘Wheat and barley beer with spices’

What the label really means: Straight to the point.

The Hell-Cat review starts here

Label: Just like the previously reviewed Estrella Damm I love this label. A single gold star shines out from a matte black label. It’s simple and sophisticated, classy and elegant. As you would know, dear readers, I am generally against gold on beer labels but in this case, it’s just the right amount. It’s beautiful. Once again it ‘reeks of revolution. It reeks of liberation. It reeks of freedom. It also reeks of tradition, quality, and a beer not to be messed with. The label is tough, staunch, unblinking in the face of a pudgy, angry dictator with a penchant for tight trousers. It stares down authority and gives the finger to establishment.’ Who wouldn’t want to be seen holding this?

I give it a label rating of 8.5 out of 10.

AROMA:  Deliciously hoppy, floral aromas.

Taste: GLASS – Oh wow. This is one superbly crafted brew. All the elements are there for a smooth wheat beer with an undercurrent of citrus, but somehow it rises above this to pure brilliance in every drop. It’s clean, crisp and delicious. I am very impressed with this beer and finding it hard to stop drinking.Inedit - GLASS

I give it a beer from glass rating of 8 out of 10.

Taste: BOTTLE – From the bottle, Inedit loses a good deal of that clean, refreshing mouth feel and becomes a little watery. Flavours are definitely diminished here, and while it still gives a fine glimpse into this heavenly brew it most certainly is better from the glass.

I give it a taste from bottle rating of 6 out of 10.

Accompanying food: Drunken garlic prawns.

Best season to appreciate: Definitely a summer brew.

All-nighter beer? For sure! This is very easy to drink and it’s refreshing nature keeps you wanting more.

Other: This is my first review in a while and the reason for that is revealed over at my official Facebook page – come join me why don’t you? In the mean time I’ll get back to bringing weekly reviews your way.

NEXT WEEK: Pistonhead

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Granite Pils - BOTTLEGranite Pils

Company info:
Granite Belt Brewery

Stanthorpe, QLD

[www.granitebeltbrewery.com.au]

Bottle size sampled: 330ml

Alcohol: 5.2%
Standard drinks: 1.4

Cap type: Non-twist

Cost: I picked this up for $4.99 AU

Label info: ‘With a sharp, bitter taste, this pilsner is not for the faint hearted. In the Granite Belt we recommend you harden up with Granite Pils’

What the label really means: Oh they breed em tough in the Granite Belt don’t they?

The Hell-Cat review starts here

Label: The label features a big beefy bloke with an uncanny resemblance to Aussie icon Mark Jacko Jackson. He takes centre stage holding two ‘1.5L’ steins of beer aloft. He’s a muscly beefcake bloke with muscles rippling across his badly airbrushed chest, his white hair sticks up in salute to the sulphur crested cockatoo, and underneath the words ‘Granite Pils’ are presented in a strong font. It’s a mixture of silver and greys, and it reflects the colour of granite quite well. Unfortunately for me I don’t think the design works too well. I think Jacko’s t-shirt gets lost in a sea of grey and it turns out to be a little plain. This would be improved hugely if the bloke was replaced by an all stone humanoid holding the beers aloft, on a sea of say crimson red. 

I give it a label rating of 5 out of 10.Granite Pils - GLASS

AROMA:  Very mild soft citrus wheat aromas. Not as strong as I had hoped.

Taste: GLASS – Rising above the ranks of many pilsners who have gone before, Granite Pils delivers all of the wheaty citrus goodness you could ask for, but with a sprinkling of bitterness. The bitterness gives a certain depth and character to the beer and it is very enjoyable. Over all mouth feel is impressive, with a good cleansing after taste.

I give it a beer from glass rating of 7 out of 10.

Taste: BOTTLE – Unfortunately from the bottle Granite Pils becomes a lot more watery and far less enjoyable. Plus this bottle has a slight metallic taste from where the cap once sat. I suggest you stick to the glass.

I give it a taste from bottle rating of 5 out of 10.

Accompanying food: Chargrilled seafood – prawns, squid, baby octopus…you get the picture.

Best season to appreciate: A fine Summer brew.

All-nighter beer? For sure! This is very drinkable, very sessionable.

NEXT WEEK: TBC

Thomas Hardy Ale - BOTTLEThomas Hardy’s Ale
Great Britain Flag - SMALL

Company info:
O’Hanlon’s Brewing Co Ltd
Devon, ENGLAND

[www.ohanlons.co.uk]

Bottle size sampled: 250ml

Alcohol: 11.7%
Standard drinks: 2.3

Cap type: Non-twist

Cost: Gifted

Label info:
‘In “The Trumpet-Major” Hardy wrote: “It was one of the most beautiful colour that the eye of an artist in beer could desire; full in body, yet brisk as a volcano; piquant, yet without a twang; luminous as an autumn sunset”‘.
AND
‘Britain’s strongest ale is a piece of brewing history.
Bottles of this rare, bottle conditioned classic have kept for at least 25 years, maturing in flavour like fine wine.
‘Bottle Conditioning’ is a secondary fermentation in the bottle during which Thomas Hardy’s Ale develops its uniquely rich and complex character. The process produces a sediment which is laid down over time as part of the natural fermentation process
Store upright in a cool, dark place, at about 13c.
If disturbed before serving, stand the bottle for 48 hours to allow settling. Open carefully and pour slowly to avoid agitating the sediment.’

What the label really means: I’ve always loved a good bottle conditioned brew and to think that this brew can enhance even after 25 years has my taste buds tingling with nervous energy. I’m also keen to check out that luminous autumn sunset.
48 hours is one hell of a wait if you should accidentally disturb this beer. I think I disturbed the bottle when I walked out in fishnets and suspenders, but I consumed immediately.

The Hell-Cat review starts here

Label: There is so much going on with this bottle. The gold foil around the neck can’t be overlooked, nor can the gold medal hanging there attached by red string. The coffee-stained yellow label brings the final level of cool to this bottle. The label displays a profile shot of presumably ol Tom himself sporting a mighty fine moutang. The text is a bit old worldy, and the stand-out is the batch/vintage info that displays ‘No. T 19530’ on this bottle. It also reads that this is a 2008 Edition – so I am very keen to try this 6 year old brew. Over all, I appreciate the old, distinguished look and feel of this label that is very fitting.ThomasHardyAle_GLASS

I give it a label rating of 7.5 out of 10.

AROMA:  Rich, malt toffee aromas.

Taste: GLASS – Very rich, very toffee-like, this is big in caramelised brown sugar and molasses territory. And it’s a fun place to be – it’s like a finely matured, finely tuned port. Slightly nutty, this a brew designed for the slow sip. There’s very little carbonation here which makes this super smooth and easy to drink. It’s well crafted, complex and beautiful. A highly enjoyable drop.

I give it a beer from glass rating of 8 out of 10.

Taste: BOTTLE – With a beer this good, it’s hard for it to drop too low below the line. Sure, drinking this classy brew  from the bottle seems a little cheap but the experience is only dulled ever so slightly. Those awesome toffee malt flavours continue to punch their way through with the sweetest of ease. This is a beer worth hunting for.

I give it a taste from bottle rating of 8 out of 10.

Accompanying food: This makes an awesome dessert beer. I’d like to suggest a butterscotch pudding or similar.

Best season to appreciate: An awesome Winter brew. This is THE definitive fire side supping beer.

All-nighter beer? Due to the lack of carbonation, imma say yes this is definitely an all nighter. It’s just so damn easy to drink, and you could deceptively go all night.

NEXT WEEK: Granite Pils

SteamRail Pale Ale - BOTTLESteamrail Pale Ale – Ghost of Eyre

Company info:
Steamrail Brewing Company
‘Produced for Australian Beer Connoisseurs
Hawthorn East, VIC’

[No website listed]

Bottle size sampled: 330ml

Alcohol: 4.5%
Standard drinks: 1.2

Cap type: Non-twist

Cost: I picked this up for $TBC AU

Label info: ‘Legend has it that twin ‘beerded’ brothers, Thomas and Charles, set out to find the great inland sea of Australia, Lake Eyre. Ensuring they stowed plenty of Pale Ale for their journey into the scorching centre, they soon had no choice but stay put and let the water find them. Who needs water when you have got great beer’

What the label really means: While I think the humour of this description is light and jovial, it does come off a little confused. I’m not sure who Thomas and Charles are, and how a steam rail comes into the equation.

The Hell-Cat review starts here

Label: I actually quite like this label. The green works surprisingly well, linking to the hoppy goodness within. There’s a jovial little drawing of a couple of bearded blokes on a sailing boat, with cracked dirt underneath. I like the fact that the beer isn’t taking itself very seriously and it has a good sense of fun about it. I’m still a bit confused about the two supposed adventurers depicted, and the steam rail significance.

I give it a label rating of 7.5 out of 10.

AROMA:  Really delicious galaxy hops aromas. It hints at Summery goodness within.SteamRail Pale Ale - GLASS

Taste: GLASS – This is not as great as I’d hoped. It lacks any semblance of a refined finish, has a rather dirty mouth-feel, and over all presents itself as unresolved. When battling it out with the other big gun pale ales around the country, Steamrail will struggle to keep its head up for long. Sure there’s a slight bitterness reaching out through the pervasive blandness of this brew that some may enjoy…me, not so much.

I give it a beer from glass rating of 6 out of 10.

Taste: BOTTLE – From the bottle it becomes even drier, a bit more flavourless and watery. Unfortunately it just doesn’t stack up.

I give it a taste from bottle rating of 5.5 out of 10.

Accompanying food: To be enjoyed alongside crackling pork

Best season to appreciate: A Summer brew

All-nighter beer? It’s definitely an inoffensive session brew that is potentially very easy to drink all night.

Note: At the conclusion of my tasting tonight, I did a bit of research into SteamRail Brewing Company and found this interesting article. So, while it’s now old news (I’m only just tasting this beer now!) – it appears this is contract brewed for LiquorLand / Coles and that there is no SteamRail Brewing Company. I feel a little cheated by this revelation.

NEXT WEEK: Thomas Hardy’s Ale

Mad Abbot Tripel - BOTTLEMad Abbot Tripel

Company info:
The Little Brewing Company
Port Macquarie, NSW

[thelittlebrewingcompany.com.au]

Bottle size sampled: 330ml

Alcohol: 9.5%
Standard drinks: 2.5

Cap type: Non-twist

Cost: I picked this up for $7.00 AU

Label info: ‘Influenced by the classic monastic brews of Belgium, Mad Abbot Tripel is a very strong, golden coloured ale, exhibiting aromas and flavours of sweet malt and tropical/white stone fruit characters.
This ale is balanced with ‘noble’ hop bitterness and warming alcohol in the finish. Bottle conditioned’

What the label really means: The guys at the Little Brewing Company are almost always on the money with their descriptions and their brews. If this is anything as good as it reads, it will be great.

The Hell-Cat review starts here

Label: Here’s what I said in my last review of a Little Brewing Company label: ‘The label is abbot inspired with a shape that is rounded, with a point at the top like a church window… There’s a little circle in the middle of the label that proclaims this is a ‘cellar release”
I do like this line of similar labels in the Abbot range, and I’ve always loved the little goblin character.  

I give it a label rating of 8 out of 10.

AROMA:  Nice melon, stone-fruit aromas softened with a particularly noticeable alcohol flavour.

Taste: GLASS – Orange zest combined with honey malt flavours mark this smooth brew that is propellered along by brooding alcoholic undercurrents. It’s a surprisingly heavy and thick beer that is a little deceptive given the golden appearance. It becomes very obvious very quickly that this is one masterfully crafted brew.   Mad Abbot Tripel - GLASS

I give it a beer from glass rating of 7.5 out of 10.

Taste: BOTTLE – Even heavier from the bottle, this thing hits like a sledgehammer. A slight bitterness emerges now and the attractive zesty flavours drift into the background. Definitely stick to the glass, as it’s just not as enjoyable now.

I give it a taste from bottle rating of 6 out of 10.

Accompanying food: Pastry goods would work well here…a sausage roll or a vegetable pastie would be ideal.

Best season to appreciate: More of a cool weather beer, there’s a genuine warmth felt in every glass.

All-nighter beer? This is far too strong in alcohol for me to consider this as a session brew.

NEXT WEEK: TBC